Recovery of critically ill COVID-19 patients at WYRS General Hospital with HBOT treatment

This collection of 3 articles explore the trial’s overwhelming success as well as HBOT/COVID-19 protocol for ongoing treatment of COVID-19 patients:

Rapid recovery of critically ill COVID-19 patients in ICU at WYRS General Hospital with HBO therapy

Rapid recovery of critically ill COVID-19 patients in ICU at WYRS General Hospital with HBO therapy

In this successful trial, HBOT was performed on critically ill COVID-19 patients with pneumonia and severe breathlessness. All patients had been in ICU (intensive care unit) for an average of 3 weeks with no improvement from mechanical ventilation before commencing a course of HBOT. Each patient had one HBOT session a day for a total of 3 to 5 days.

Of these patients treated, two male patients were also in the higher risk age group with multiple high-risk factors for increased mortality in COVID-19: (a 69 year old patient had hypertension, coronary heart disease, a coronary stent implant and acute myocardial infarction; and a 64 year old patient had hypertension, coronary heart disease and diabetes).

Outcome: Severe breathlessness was mitigated after the first HBOT treatment and entirely disappeared from all patients within 3 days, thanks to a rapid and lasting correction of hypoxemia. Chest CT scans taken on consecutive days, before and after treatment, showed significantly improved lung condition in each patient.

All patients were discharged from hospital after making a full recovery.

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Summary of HBOT/COVID-19 Conference of UHMS (Underwater & Hyperbaric Medical Society) HBOT committee, UHMS College of Emergency Physicians, and clinical trials doctors

Summary of HBOT/COVID-19 Conference of UHMS (Underwater & Hyperbaric Medical Society) HBOT committee, UHMS College of Emergency Physicians, and clinical trials doctors

UHMS Conference respecting highly publicized Chinese HBOT trials conducted by Dr Chen on severely ill/ICU (intensive care unit) COVID-19 patients with extreme breathlessness.

HBOT was started after routine treatments failed to stop deterioration of condition. HBOT resulted in consistent and lasting reoxygenation of blood and vital organs to healthy levels resulting in a full recovery of all patients. UHMS acknowledge the trials clinical findings including, and not limited to, evidence that each patients’: (i) Elevated PaCO2 (partial pressure of carbon dioxide) and elevated lactate found in patients prior to HBOT trial commencement indicated a trend of over-ventilation with insufficient oxygen uptake; (ii) SpO2 (oxygenated blood) consistently increased daily with each HBOT treatment; (iii) Breathlessness was significantly alleviated after 1 HBOT session and disappeared entirely by day 3 of HBOT; (iv) Digestive tract symptoms disappeared within 5 days of HBOT; (v) Blood oxygenation from the lungs (PaO2 oxygen pressure in arterial blood) and SaO2 oxygen bound to haemoglobin) significantly increased with each HBOT session; (vi) Lymphocyte and LYM% (white blood cells highly concentrated in lymphatic system) synonymous with a healthy system increased after HBOT treatment; (vii) Pre- vs Post HBOT chest CT imaging showed significantly improved status: less inflammation of the lungs’ alveoli (responsible for oxygen exchange) and significantly lower density of infection; (viii) Elevated C-Reactive Protein (CRP), a clinical marker of infection and inflammation, decreased following HBOT treatment; (ix) Elevated Fibrinogen and D-Dimer (clinical markers of inflammation and tissue injury), recorded in patients pre-HBOT trial, significantly declined following HBOT treatment.

In the course of the conference discussion, consideration is given to the protocol implemented by Dr Chen to achieve these results as well as the implementation of HBOT protocol for COVID-19 patients going forward.

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In contribution to the HBOT/COVID-19 conference of UHMS, Dr Chen methodically addresses each summarised point contextually with rationale for the application and protocol of HBOT treatment of COVID-19, and the consolidation of therapy protoco

In contribution to the HBOT/COVID-19 conference of UHMS, Dr Chen methodically addresses each summarised point contextually with rationale for the application and protocol of HBOT treatment of COVID-19, and the consolidation of therapy protocol

On the discussion of ventilators that are widely in use for COVID-19 patients without having undergone the rigors of trials specifically for COVID-19, Dr Chen refers to clinical HBOT trials already conducted that have led to the current day practice and successful treatment of a wide range of conditions including the treatment of viruses, hypoxia, tissue inflammation and infection and high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE).

Whilst mechanical ventilation provides the breathing motion for unconscious and debilitated patients, mortality rates for COVID-19 patients on mechanical ventilation remain high. Mechanical ventilation physically pushes an increased oxygen flow on the, already compromised, lungs resulting in tissue trauma and poor oxygen uptake.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy, on the other hand, is gentle on the lungs. Oxygen is administered in a pressurised environment and applies no strain on the breathing process and no force on the lungs, enabling the absorption of significantly higher concentrations of oxygen in the blood until a healthy level is reached and maintained. HBOT is proven to reverse hypoxia and lung inflammation, stopping deterioration of mild, severe and critically ill COVID-19 patients, whilst enabling a reoxygenation of the vital organs and recovery.

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The overall problem with HBOT is that after almost 100 years of practice, very few randomised controlled trials are conducted and there are conflicting results. We need to organise well designed, large RCTs to prove or reject the efficacy of HBOT.

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